SUGAR LAND Population 74189 Altitude- 82

General-

Oyster Creek Bridge in one of Sugar Lands many beautiful parksThis unique town was built and developed around the sugar industry, on land granted to Samuel M. Williams in 1828.  Williams' brother, Nathaniel, purchased the land in 1838 and with a third brother, Mathew, operated Oakland plantation growing cotton, corn and sugarcane. In 1853, Benjamin Terry and William J. Kyle purchased the plantation. Terry is known for organizing Terry's Texas Rangers during the Civil War and for naming the town. Upon the deaths of Terry and Kyle, Colonel E. H. Cunningham bought the 12,500 acre plantation soon after the Civil War and developed the town around his sugar refining  plant. In the early 1900's the refinery was sold and named Imperial Sugar. Around the turn of the century, most of the sugar cane crops were destroyed by a harsh winter. Now refineries import cane  through the Port of Galveston.  Sugar Land remained a company town until incorporated in 1959. Today Sugar Land has a diversified economic base. The city's growth parallels the huge growth of Houston and Harris County. 

Museum of Southern History -

Sugar Land's Museum of Southern History recalls the history of Sugar Land and Fort Bend County. Memorabilia exhibited include an extensive handgun collection from the War Between the States; a bell from the Union Ship, USS Harriet Lane, captured during the Civil War's Battle of Galveston; furnishings and clothing from the antebellum era; exhibit of Terry's Texas Rangers; medical supplies and surgical instruments, and authentic Confederated uniforms. Traveling exhibits are displayed throughout the year. The Museum's library has unusual and rare books.

Open Tuesday - Friday, 10a.m. - 4p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 1 - 4p.m.
At 14070 Southwest Freeway. For information, call 281-269-7171.

Aerodrome Ice Skating Complex -

The facility was named after the common WWII name for an airport and as a nostalgic tribute to the aerodynamic bombers of WWII. The Houston Aeros professional hockey team shares the 17,000 square feet of ice with figure skating classes and exhibitions, and public skating. 281/265-7465

Brazos Bend State Park -

Oak trees and lakes are plentiful in these 4,897 acres of Brazos River bottomlands. Among the wildlife are white-tail deer, coyotes, waterfowl and alligators. Facilities include screened shelters, a recreation hall, restrooms, showers, picnic areas, fishing, nature trails and campgrounds. (800)792-1112
Brazos Bend State Park

Fort Bend Museum -

This award-winning museum chronicles the settling of the Fort Bend area by the "Old 300" who received Mexican land grants through Stephen F. Austin and describes their first 100 years. It is because of this settlement, the first Anglo community in Texas, that Fort Bend's current communities have such names as "First Colony" and "New Territory." On the museum grounds are three restored historical homes. The Long-Smith Cottage, home of Jane Long, called the "Mother of Texas, is a typical middle class home. The MacFarland House is a restored Reconstruction-era mansion rumored to be haunted. The Moore Home is a Victorian mansion which features traveling art exhibits in some rooms. 281/342-6478

Fort Bend County Fair and Livestock Show -

Sept 29-Oct 7, 2000: Each fall a parade featuring dozens of school bands, floats and drill teams leads Fort Bend in this ten-day extravaganza of food, rides, auctions, youth and adult exhibits, bands and folk and country dancing. It is the largest county fair in Texas and draws nearly 200,000 visitors. 281/342-6171 
Fort Bend County Fairgrounds

George Observatory -

About 500 acres of this 23,000-acre working ranch are open to the public, including a restored Victorian mansion, blacksmith shop and other farm buildings. Living History demonstrations are performed each weekend from April through December. 281/343-0218

George Ranch Historical Park -

About 500 acres of this 23,000-acre working ranch are open to the public, including a restored Victorian mansion, blacksmith shop and other farm buildings. Living History demonstrations are performed each weekend from April through December. 281/343-0218

Great Southwest Equestrian Center -

The elegant southern-style mansion sits in front of a world-class show complex featuring a 150 ft. by 300 ft. covered arena that seats 4,200 people. Witness a variety of horse shows and events, or learn to ride a horse. 281/578-7669

Golf -

Sugar Land offers the avid golfer many courses from which to choose.

Visit East Texas Outside Guide for more information!

Visit The Sugar Land Home Page for more information!

Visit Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce for more information!

 

Back to the top